Journal Article

Development Patterns of Industrial Design in the Third World: A Conceptual Model for Newly Industrialized Countries

H. ALPAY ER

in Journal of Design History

Published on behalf of Design History Society

Volume 10, issue 3, pages 293-307
Published in print January 1997 | ISSN: 0952-4649
Published online January 1997 | e-ISSN: 1741-7279 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jdh/10.3.293
Development Patterns of Industrial Design in the Third World: A Conceptual Model for Newly Industrialized Countries

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • History of Art
  • Art Forms
  • Industrial and Commercial Art
  • Art Styles

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

This article first critically examines the early literature on the role of industrial design in the Third World and subsequently sets out to explain the dynamics behind the development of industrial design in a group of Third World countries categorized as Newly Industrialized Countries (NICs). For the development of industrial design activity in NICs, the vital ingredient appears to be competition. This is also conditioned by the market orientation of economic/industrial activity, which itself is largely determined by the governmental development strategies in the context of a globally organized world economy. The article concludes with a new theoretical model for the development patterns of industrial design in NICs.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: History of Art ; Art Forms ; Industrial and Commercial Art ; Art Styles

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.