Journal Article

John Cotton Dana and the Politics of Exhibiting Industrial Art in the US, 1909–1929

Nicolas Maffei

in Journal of Design History

Published on behalf of Design History Society

Volume 13, issue 4, pages 301-317
Published in print January 2000 | ISSN: 0952-4649
Published online January 2000 | e-ISSN: 1741-7279 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jdh/13.4.301
John Cotton Dana and the Politics of Exhibiting Industrial Art in the US, 1909–1929

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Art Forms
  • Art Styles
  • History of Art
  • Industrial and Commercial Art

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Between 1909 and 1929, John Cotton Dana directed New Jersey's Newark Museum and pioneered the museum exhibition of mass-produced goods, initiating a trend among American art museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Through his work, Dana hoped to reform the museum community, society and industry. He saw his museum's activities as a progressive response to the problems of increased industrialization, an expanding consumer culture and the country's search for a national aesthetic based on the machine. This paper examines Dana's influence by investigating his correspondence, publications and exhibitions, including the first display in America of modern industrial design, the 1912 exhibit of the work of the Deutscher Werkbund.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Art Forms ; Art Styles ; History of Art ; Industrial and Commercial Art

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.