Journal Article

Amnesty International's Methods of Engaging Youth in Human Rights Education: Curriculum in the United States and Experiential Learning in Burkina Faso

Karen Hopkins

in Journal of Human Rights Practice

Volume 3, issue 1, pages 71-92
Published in print March 2011 | ISSN: 1757-9619
Published online March 2011 | e-ISSN: 1757-9627 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jhuman/hur007
Amnesty International's Methods of Engaging Youth in Human Rights Education: Curriculum in the United States and Experiential Learning in Burkina Faso

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Ethical Issues and Debates
  • Human Rights and Immigration
  • Human Rights
  • Politics
  • Social Movements and Social Change

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Human rights education (HRE) is a useful tool to build solidarity among youth and activism for social justice at local, national and international levels. In order to understand how HRE can be effective in accomplishing this daunting task, educators should consider three factors: leadership skills, awareness, and empowerment. Two approaches, curriculum-based and experiential learning, have the potential to contribute to these goals and to break down negative assumptions of youth culture, while developing their interests and their capabilities in initiating positive change. This article will compare Amnesty International's approach to HRE in the capitals of two countries: Washington DC in the United States, and Ouagadougou in Burkina Faso. The first case study analyzes Amnesty International USA's (AIUSA's) Human Rights Education Service Corps (HRESC), which uses a curriculum-based awareness approach to working with high school students. The second case study examines a transformational approach to experiential learning in Burkina Faso through Amnesty International Burkina Faso (AIBF), which was charged with hosting Amnesty's first Youth Forum in Africa. Although these two programs have the same basic goal of increasing awareness of the rights outlined in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), the learning outcomes for the youth and communities involved are different. Comparing these two approaches to HRE will help educators and activists to understand best practices in HRE for youth, and how peer education can strengthen outcomes when incorporated into education programs.

Keywords: Amnesty International; curriculum; education; experiential learning; youth leadership

Journal Article.  8187 words. 

Subjects: Ethical Issues and Debates ; Human Rights and Immigration ; Human Rights ; Politics ; Social Movements and Social Change

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.