Journal Article

The Major Powers on Trial

Romeo Dallaire, Kishan Manocha and Nishan Degnarain

in Journal of International Criminal Justice

Volume 3, issue 4, pages 861-878
Published in print September 2005 | ISSN: 1478-1387
Published online September 2005 | e-ISSN: 1478-1395 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jicj/mqi063
The Major Powers on Trial

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Faced with incontrovertible evidence of the most clear-cut case of genocide possible, the international community failed to denounce the evil and to take action to stop the killings taking place in Rwanda in 1994. Under the influence of three major powers—France, the United States and the United Kingdom—the United Nations was disabled from taking the necessary action because the mass slaughter of the Tutsi people did not impinge on these powers' narrowly defined national interests. In the specific case of France, there is evidence to show that this power arguably aided and abetted the genocide. Yet, in contrast, these three powers were able to take decisive and quick action when faced with an outraged domestic public in response to the humanitarian crisis which unfolded from the genocide. There are many reasons why individuals and governments cannot bring themselves to use the word ‘genocide’. In the case of Rwanda, perhaps the enormity of the concept prevented those who were in the midst of it from recognizing it for what it actually was.

Journal Article.  8623 words. 

Subjects: Criminal Law ; International Law ; International Criminal Law ; International Humanitarian Law ; Transnational Crime

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