Journal Article

Integration of Repellents, Attractants, and Insecticides in a "Push-Pull" Strategy for Managing German Cockroach (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae) Populations

in Journal of Medical Entomology

Published on behalf of Entomological Society of America

Volume 37, issue 3, pages 427-434
Published in print May 2000 | ISSN: 0022-2585
Published online September 2014 | e-ISSN: 1938-2928 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jmedent/37.3.427
Integration of Repellents, Attractants, and Insecticides in a "Push-Pull" Strategy for Managing German Cockroach (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae) Populations

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"Push-pull" is a behavior manipulation strategy in which behavior-modifying stimuli are integrated with a pest control agent. We evaluated the efficacy of an insecticide bait in combination with attractants ("pull"), repellents ("push"), or both ("push-pull") using a hydramethylnon-based bait, feces-contaminated surfaces as an attractant, and methyl neodecanamide-treated surfaces to repel cockroaches. Both adult males and first-instar German cockroaches, Blattella germanica (L.), chose shelters nearest the attractant-treated surfaces and farthest from the repellent-treated surfaces. Food consumption was highest from food nearest the preferred shelters, and mortality was highest when the insecticide bait was near the preferred shelter. These patterns were more apparent in first instars than in adults. Our results from large arena studies in the laboratory show that the push-pull strategy can be used to displace pests from resources or commodities that are to be protected, and simultaneously lure the pest to an attractant source coupled with a pest control agent. Concentrating cockroaches into a limited area should facilitate the precision-targeting of the pest population and promises to reduce insecticide use.

Keywords: Blattella germanica; German cockroach; repellent; attractant; methyl neoalkanamide

Journal Article.  4921 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Disease Ecology and Epidemiology ; Entomology

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