Journal Article

Family History of Hematopoietic Malignancy and Risk of Lymphoma

Ellen T. Chang, Karin Ekström Smedby, Henrik Hjalgrim, Anna Porwit-MacDonald, Göran Roos, Bengt Glimelius and Hans-Olov Adami

in JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute

Volume 97, issue 19, pages 1466-1474
Published in print October 2005 | ISSN: 0027-8874
Published online October 2005 | e-ISSN: 1460-2105 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jnci/dji293
Family History of Hematopoietic Malignancy and Risk of Lymphoma

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Background: A family history of hematopoietic malignancy is associated with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), although the magnitude of the relative risk is unclear. We estimated the association between familial hematopoietic cancer and risk of lymphoma using validated, registry-based family data, and we also investigated whether associations between some environmental exposures and risk of lymphoma vary between individuals with and without such a family history. Methods: In a population-based case–control study of malignant lymphoma, 1506 case patients and 1229 control subjects were linked to the Swedish Multi-Generation Register and then to the Swedish Cancer Register to ascertain history of cancer in first-degree relatives of patients with malignant lymphoma. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations with the risk of lymphoma. Results: A history of hematopoietic malignancy in any first-degree relative was associated with an increased risk of all NHL (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2 to 2.5), common B-cell NHL subtypes, and HL. Relative risks were generally stronger in association with sibling hematopoietic cancer (OR for all NHL = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.3 to 7.6) than with parental hematopoietic cancer (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1 to 2.3). A family history of NHL or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was associated with an increased risk of several NHL subtypes and HL, whereas familial multiple myeloma was associated with a higher risk of follicular lymphoma. There was no statistically significant heterogeneity in NHL risk associations with environmental factors between individuals with and without familial hematopoietic malignancy. Conclusions: The increased risk of NHL and HL among individuals with a family history of hematopoietic malignancy was approximately twofold for both lymphoma types. There was no evidence that etiologic associations varied between familial NHL and nonfamilial NHL.

Journal Article.  6690 words. 

Subjects: Medical Oncology

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