Journal Article

Revolution in Biblical Law: Some Reflections on the Role of Theory in Methodology

Bernard S. Jackson

in Journal of Semitic Studies

Published on behalf of University of Manchester

Volume 50, issue 1, pages 83-116
Published in print January 2005 | ISSN: 0022-4480
Published online January 2005 | e-ISSN: 1477-8556 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jss/fgi005
Revolution in Biblical Law: Some Reflections on the Role of Theory in Methodology

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  • Middle Eastern History
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This is a review article of J. Van Seters, A Law Book for the Diaspora (2003), H.V. Bennett, Injustice Made Legal (2002), and A. Phillips, Essays on Biblical Law (2002). In the context of biblical law, there is a range of quite different types of theoretical starting point, and the books here under review make different choices amongst them: Van Seters opts for literary/compositional theory, Bennett for social theory, Phillips for a mix of comparative law and theology (though the balance of the book as a whole tends towards the latter). Examination of this collection of books — with some privilege given to Van Seters, the implications of whose work appear farthest-reaching for the field as a whole, and taking account of the non-programmatic character of Phillips' essays in their present form — may assist us in clarifying the underlying theoretical issues, issues which no one concerned with biblical law can afford to avoid.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Middle Eastern History ; Middle Eastern Languages ; Literary Studies - World ; Biblical Studies

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