Journal Article

Anion channel activity is necessary to induce ethylene synthesis and programmed cell death in response to oxalic acid

Rafik Errakhi, Patrice Meimoun, Arnaud Lehner, Guillaume Vidal, Joël Briand, Françoise Corbineau, Jean-Pierre Rona and François Bouteau

in Journal of Experimental Botany

Published on behalf of Society for Experimental Biology

Volume 59, issue 11, pages 3121-3129
Published in print August 2008 | ISSN: 0022-0957
Published online July 2008 | e-ISSN: 1460-2431 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/ern166
Anion channel activity is necessary to induce ethylene synthesis and programmed cell death in response to oxalic acid

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Oxalic acid is thought to be a key factor of the early pathogenicity stage in a wide range of necrotrophic fungi. Studies were conducted to determine whether oxalate could induce programmed cell death (PCD) in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells and to detail the transduction of the signalling pathway induced by oxalate. Arabidopsis thaliana cells were treated with millimolar concentrations of oxalate. Cell death was quantified and ion flux variations were analysed from electrophysiological measurements. Involvement of the anion channel and ethylene in the signal transduction leading to PCD was determined by using specific inhibitors. Oxalic acid induced a PCD displaying cell shrinkage and fragmentation of DNA into internucleosomal fragments with a requirement for active gene expression and de novo protein synthesis, characteristic hallmarks of PCD. Other responses generally associated with plant cell death, such as anion effluxes leading to plasma membrane depolarization, mitochondrial depolarization, and ethylene synthesis, were also observed following addition of oxalate. The results show that oxalic acid activates an early anionic efflux which is a necessary prerequisite for the synthesis of ethylene and for the PCD in A. thaliana cells.

Keywords: Anion channel; Arabidopsis thaliana; ethylene; oxalic acid; programmed cell death

Journal Article.  4985 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry

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