Journal Article

<i>Arabidopsis thaliana</i> proliferating cell nuclear antigen has several potential sumoylation sites

Wojciech Strzalka, Piotr Labecki, Filip Bartnicki, Chhavi Aggarwal, Maria Rapala-Kozik, Chiharu Tani, Katsunori Tanaka and Halina Gabrys

in Journal of Experimental Botany

Published on behalf of Society for Experimental Biology

Volume 63, issue 8, pages 2971-2983
Published in print May 2012 | ISSN: 0022-0957
Published online February 2012 | e-ISSN: 1460-2431 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/ers002
Arabidopsis thaliana proliferating cell nuclear antigen has several potential sumoylation sites

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Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is post-translationally modified in yeast and animal cells. Major studies carried out in the last decade have focused on the role of sumoylated and ubiquitinated PCNA. Using different approaches, an interaction between plant PCNA and SUMO both in vivo and in bacteria has been demonstrated for the first time. In addition, identical sumoylation patterns for both AtPCNA1 and 2 were observed in bacteria. The plant PCNA sumoylation pattern has been shown to differ significantly from that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This result contrasts with a common opinion based on previous structural analysis of yeast, human, and plant PCNAs, which treats PCNA as a highly conserved protein even between species. Analyses of AtPCNA post-translational modifications using different SUMO proteins (SUMO1, 2, 3, and 5) revealed similar modification patterns for each tested SUMO protein. Potential target lysine residues that might be sumoylated in vivo were identified on the basis of in bacteria AtPCNA mutational analyses. Taken together, these results clearly show that plant PCNA is post-translationally modified in bacteria and may be sumoylated in a plant cell at various sites. These data open up important new perspectives for further detailed studies on the role of PCNA sumoylation in plant cells.

Keywords: Arabidopsis thaliana; PCNA; SUMO

Journal Article.  8607 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry

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