Journal Article

THE CURSE OF GOD IN FAULKNER'S GO DOWN, MOSES

Sandra Lee Kleppe

in Literature and Theology

Volume 10, issue 4, pages 361-369
Published in print December 1996 | ISSN: 0269-1205
e-ISSN: 1477-4623 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/litthe/10.4.361
THE CURSE OF GOD IN FAULKNER'S GO DOWN, MOSES

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William Faulkner frequently employed religious perspectives throughtout his work. This article explores Faulkner's use of religious motifs in Go Down, Moses. The main protagonist of the book, Issac McCaslin, is caught up in a complex web of religious influences which form his world view from boyhood to old age. Though he is nurturned on the spiritual primitivism of his mentor, the part-Indian Sarn Fathers, it is nevertheless a personal form of Stoicism and especially the Protestant faith of the Soth which will have the most pervasive influence on him and his family. In Go Down, Moses, Faulkner encodes a myth of an inescapable curse of God by subtly pattering the McCaslin genealogy on the Old Testament patriarchs, openingup for a Bakhtinian intertexual reading of the book.

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Subjects: Literature ; Religion and Art, Literature, and Music

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