Journal Article

CHRISTIAN AND FOLKLORIC TRADITION IN THE BEOWULF: DEATH AND THE DRAGON EPISODE

Judith Garde

in Literature and Theology

Volume 11, issue 4, pages 325-346
Published in print December 1997 | ISSN: 0269-1205
Published online December 1997 | e-ISSN: 1477-4623 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/litthe/11.4.325
CHRISTIAN AND FOLKLORIC TRADITION IN THE BEOWULF: DEATH AND THE DRAGON EPISODE

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Literature
  • Religion and Art, Literature, and Music

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

It is reiterated in Part I that biblical precedent and the omnipotence of God are fundamental aspects of Beowulf, dominating the medieval Christian agenda.In the first of two complementry stories, the hero of this cotemporary English moral folk fable is introduced as God's right-thinking champion, triumphantly destroying monstrous, heathen enemies. Conventional themes,in the form of structured folkloric functions sequences and ‘moves’, are then related to familiar references to and the unsolicited interaction of God, revealing that the death of the old hero-king is appropriately and satisfyingly devised to fulfil mythic-heroic, folkloric and Christian eschatological expectations.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Literature ; Religion and Art, Literature, and Music

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.