Journal Article

THE ABSOLUTE IMPLIED: COLERIDGE ON WORDSWORTH AND THE BIBLE

Charles I Armstrong

in Literature and Theology

Volume 14, issue 4, pages 363-372
Published in print December 2000 | ISSN: 0269-1205
Published online December 2000 | e-ISSN: 1477-4623 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/litthe/14.4.363
THE ABSOLUTE IMPLIED: COLERIDGE ON WORDSWORTH AND THE BIBLE

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Coleridge's famous literary criticism of Wordsworth is approached from the vantage point of Coleridge's the logical writings. By comparing Coleridge's pronouncements on poetry and Wordsworth in the Biographia Literana with his statements on the status and truth-value of the Bible, a number of similarities are uncovered Coleridge's interpretation of the Scripture—in the Biographia, The Statesman's Manual and Confessions of an Inquiring Spirit—starts off from an absolute position, but doubts and caveats lead him to make considerable modifications, and he ends up with a reading of the Bible that is perilously close to his view on Wordsworth.

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Subjects: Literature ; Religion and Art, Literature, and Music

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