Journal Article

Remember to Forget the Alamo: The Dynamics of Cultural Memory in John Sayles' <i>Lone Star</i>

Glenn Whitehouse

in Literature and Theology

Volume 16, issue 3, pages 291-310
Published in print August 2002 | ISSN: 0269-1205
Published online August 2002 | e-ISSN: 1477-4623 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/litthe/16.3.291
Remember to Forget the Alamo: The Dynamics of Cultural Memory in John Sayles' Lone Star

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This article interprets John Sayles' 1996 film Lone Star as a reflection on how a community whose history is steeped in violence, such as the US, should seek to manage its difficult cultural memory. A conceptual triad of love, justice, and tragedy utilised to interpret the film's last line, ‘Forget the Alamo.’ It is concluded that the memory of a troubled past can only serve as the basis for responsible public life when we, like the characters in Lone Star, choose to remember with a charity that liberates both our ancestors and our selves from having to play out the roles of hero or villain.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Literature ; Religion and Art, Literature, and Music

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