Journal Article

Tom Altizer and William Blake: The Apocalypse of Belief

Linda Freedman

in Literature and Theology

Volume 25, issue 1, pages 20-31
Published in print March 2011 | ISSN: 0269-1205
Published online January 2011 | e-ISSN: 1477-4623 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/litthe/frq070
Tom Altizer and William Blake: The Apocalypse of Belief

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For the radical death of God theologian, Thomas J.J. Altizer, William Blake’s epic and prophetic poetry instigated a redemptive Christian vision. Altizer, writing in the 1960s in America, was concerned with finding a theology that suited his time, one that would participate in a reversal of the alienation and dehumanisation he saw as the plague of his own highly technological and urban society. In Blake, he found not only a theology but also a vital poetics for theology; Blake was, for Altizer, a unique Christian visionary whose language and form created a new living myth, invaluable to the contemporary American theologian. This article discusses the importance of Blake’s poetics for Altizer’s radical apocalypse of belief and assesses the theological and literary stakes of his project.

Journal Article.  5086 words. 

Subjects: Literature ; Religion and Art, Literature, and Music

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