Chapter

Commentary: The Broader Autism Phenotype: Implications for Research and Clinical Practice

Jeremy R. Parr, Kerstin Wittemeyer and Ann S. Le Couteur

in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Published on behalf of Oxford University Press

Published in print May 2011 | ISBN: 9780195371826
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199965212 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/med/9780195371826.003.0034
Commentary: The Broader Autism Phenotype: Implications for Research and Clinical Practice

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Over the last two decades, the broader autism phenotype (BAP) has become a focus for researchers and clinicians alike; this is in part due to its central role in the conceptualization of autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and its importance for identifying ASD susceptibility genes. Studies of very young children with ASD, and prospective studies of siblings of children with ASD have provided important insights about “typical” development, our understanding of early ASD characteristics and subsequent developmental trajectories, and the range of possible outcomes for affected individuals. For clinicians and researchers, who await the publication of the DSM-V and ICD-11 clinical conceptualizations of ASD phenotypes, the need to have a better understanding of what constitutes the BAP is a priority. This commentary summarizes some of the important challenges and opportunities for BAP research and the implications for clinicians who diagnose and provide services for children with ASD, and their families.

Chapter.  3007 words. 

Subjects: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry ; Neurology ; Neuroscience

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