Chapter

Restrictions of access to pesticides in suicide prevention

Michael R Phillips and David Gunnell

in Oxford Textbook of Suicidology and Suicide Prevention

Published on behalf of Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198570059
Published online July 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199640461 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/med/9780198570059.003.0078

Series: Oxford Textbooks

Restrictions of access to pesticides in suicide prevention

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Intentional pesticide ingestion is one of the most common methods of suicide, accounting for up to one-third of all suicides worldwide. The importance of intentional ingestion of pesticides was initially recognized in Asia and the Western Pacific but it is becoming evident that it is also a significant problem in Africa and, to some extent, in Latin America. Pesticides are employed in about 300,000 suicides annually—primarily in the rural areas of low-and middle-income countries (LAMIC)—so limiting access to these lethal agents could, theoretically, substantially reduce the global burden of mortality due to suicide. Organophosphate pesticides are responsible for a large proportion of pesticide self-poisonings and the majority of deaths.

Chapter.  4440 words. 

Subjects: Psychiatry

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