Chapter

Trauma pain and procedural pain: prevention of chronic pain following acute trauma

Johan Emmanuel

Edited by Brigitta Brandner

in Acute Pain

Published on behalf of Oxford University Press

Published in print June 2010 | ISBN: 9780199234721
Published online May 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191739972 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/med/9780199234721.003.0008

Series: Oxford Pain Management Library

Trauma pain and procedural pain: prevention of chronic pain following acute trauma

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Opioid analgesics should be used with extreme cautions in the self-ventilating head injured patient.

Gastric emptying ceases after trauma. This will limit the efficacy of oral analgesics.

Epidural analgesia has been shown to be an independent predictor of decreased morbidity and mortality in thoracic trauma.

Femoral nerve block is as effective as intravenous morphine in femoral shaft fractures.

Short-term non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use has no proven deleterious effects in humans, and should be part of multimodal management.

Trauma is a risk factor for complex regional pain syndrome. Prevention should be aimed at early graded mobilizations with adequate pain relief.

Post-amputation pain encompasses stump pain (nociceptive and neuropathic), and phantom limb pain.

Chapter.  4007 words. 

Subjects: Critical Care ; Pain Medicine

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