Chapter

Comparative Morbidity and Mortality of Women Serving in the US Military During a Decade of Warfare

Robert F. DeFraites, David W. Niebuhr, Brigilda C. Teneza, Leslie L. Clark and Sharon L. Ludwig

in Women at War

Published on behalf of Oxford University Press

Published in print June 2015 | ISBN: 9780199344536
Published online August 2015 | e-ISBN: 9780190228118 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/med/9780199344536.003.0001
Comparative Morbidity and Mortality of Women Serving in the US Military During a Decade of Warfare

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This chapter uses US Department of Defense data to provide a statistical overview of health consequences of deployment of over 220,000 women to combat operations in Southwest Asia during a decade of conflict (2002–2011). Women have fulfilled an increasingly prominent role in the US military since the creation of an all-volunteer force after the Vietnam War. Being restricted by policy to assignment to “non-combat” support and service occupations and units, US military women in recent operations experienced relatively fewer injuries directly attributable to combat than their male counterparts. However, women have not been entirely spared the rigors of warfare, and their illnesses and injuries are similar in many ways to those of deployed men. The health experiences of deployed women as a group provide valuable insights into the potential health consequences for a future military force in which women are forecasted to assume more directly the burden of combat.

Chapter.  5965 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Psychiatry

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