Chapter

Amputations, endoprosthetic joint replacement, massive bone replacement, other alternatives

William J.S. Aston, Gordon Blunn and Timothy W.R. Briggs

in Oxford Textbook of Trauma and Orthopaedics

Second edition

Published on behalf of Oxford University Press

Published in print August 2011 | ISBN: 9780199550647
Published online April 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199608249 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/med/9780199550647.003.002002

Series: Oxford Textbooks

Amputations, endoprosthetic joint replacement, massive bone replacement, other alternatives

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The aims of the bone tumour surgeon are to improve survival and maintain optimal function of the patient; this can be achieved by amputation or limb salvage

Limb salvage provides no greater risk to the survival of the patient than with amputation

Reconstruction after removal of the tumour is commonly achieved by using endoprosthetic replacements, autografts, or massive allografts

Complications of limb salvage include infection and difficulties associated with soft tissue reattachment and coverage of the bone replacement.

Chapter.  2436 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery

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