Chapter

Structural validity and the classification of mental disorders

Robert F. Krueger and Nicholas R. Eaton

in Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry II

Published on behalf of Oxford University Press

Published in print April 2012 | ISBN: 9780199642205
Published online February 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780191754777 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/med/9780199642205.003.0029

Series: International Perspectives in Philosophy & Psychiatry

Structural validity and the classification of mental disorders

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In this broad and informative chapter, Krueger and Eaton provide a strong psychometric critique of the current psychiatric nosologic process. This paper well illustrates the tension seen elsewhere in this volume between the clinical-historical approach that psychiatry has typically adopted toward its diagnostic categories and the psychometric, measurement-oriented approach that has been cultivated for decades in the discipline of psychology. After a brief review of the concept of reliability, the authors turn to their central concept of validity. In the latter parts of their essay, K&E point out the limitations of a nosology with inadequate structural validity and then begin to map out how such a situation might be ameliorated. They make the key point that any such effort will be driven by the data that is collected for such analyses. The authors then review the seminal work, in which Krueger was a leader, looking at the structure of common psychopathology. In this broad and informative chapter, Krueger and Eaton provide a strong psychometric critique of the current psychiatric nosologic process. This paper well illustrates the tension seen elsewhere in this volume between the clinical-historical approach that psychiatry has typically adopted toward its diagnostic categories and the psychometric, measurement-oriented approach that has been cultivated for decades in the discipline of psychology. After a brief review of the concept of reliability, the authors turn to their central concept of validity. In the latter parts of their essay, K&E point out the limitations of a nosology with inadequate structural validity and then begin to map out how such a situation might be ameliorated. They make the key point that any such effort will be driven by the data that is collected for such analyses. The authors then review the seminal work, in which Krueger was a leader, looking at the structure of common psychopathology.

Chapter.  6826 words. 

Subjects: Psychiatry

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