Chapter

In praise of famous men: early cortisone studies

Andrew Bush

in Landmark Papers in Allergy

Published on behalf of Oxford University Press

Published in print February 2013 | ISBN: 9780199651559
Published online April 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780191754241 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/med/9780199651559.003.0023

Series: Landmark Papers

In praise of famous men: early cortisone studies

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  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Immunology
  • Respiratory Medicine and Pulmonology

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A STUDY has been undertaken to determine whether or not cortisone will influence bronchial asthma and hay fever resulting from sensitivity to ragweed pollen. A number of general facts have suggested the possible value of such a study. Experimental data have interlinked three systems and mechanisms of the body: the adrenal cortex, lymphoid tissue, and reactions of immunity. The use of cortisone in the treatment of hay fever or less severe bronchial asthma would not be justified under present circumstances of supply and understanding. However, the advantages . . . seem to justify its use in these diseases as a means of studying the mechanism of the allergic state. . . . 3 persons having both bronchial asthma and hay fever resulting from sensitivity to ragweed pollen were selected. Such patients were given an injection either of cortisone or of cholesterol into the gluteal muscles. . . . In addition to studies directed toward an evaluation of asthma and hay fever, the patients were observed for evidence of any untoward reaction to cortisone.

Chapter.  1477 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology ; Immunology ; Respiratory Medicine and Pulmonology

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