Journal Article

Constraining the amount of circumstellar matter and dust around Type Ia supernovae through near-infrared echoes

Keiichi Maeda, Takaya Nozawa, Takashi Nagao and Kentaro Motohara

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

Published on behalf of The Royal Astronomical Society

Volume 452, issue 4, pages 3281-3292
ISSN: 0035-8711
Published online August 2015 | e-ISSN: 1365-2966 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stv1498
Constraining the amount of circumstellar matter and dust around Type Ia supernovae through near-infrared echoes

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The circumstellar (CS) environment is key to understanding progenitors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), as well as the origin of a peculiar extinction property towards SNe Ia for cosmological application. It has been suggested that multiple scatterings of SN photons by CS dust may explain the non-standard reddening law. In this paper, we examine the effect of re-emission of SN photons by CS dust in the infrared (IR) wavelength regime. This effect allows the observed IR light curves to be used as a constraint on the position/size and the amount of CS dust. The method was applied to observed near-infrared (NIR) SN Ia samples; meaningful upper limits on the CS dust mass were derived even under conservative assumptions. We thereby clarify a difficulty associated with the CS dust-scattering model as a general explanation for the peculiar reddening law, while it may still apply to a sub-sample of highly reddened SNe Ia. For SNe Ia in general, the environment at the interstellar scale appears to be responsible for the non-standard extinction law. Furthermore, deeper limits can be obtained using the standard nature of SN Ia NIR light curves. In this application, an upper limit of [math] yr−1 (for the wind velocity of ∼10 km s−1) is obtained for a mass-loss rate from a progenitor up to ∼0.01 pc, and [math] yr−1 up to ∼0.1 pc.

Keywords: Circumstellar matter; stars: mass-loss; supernovae: general; dust, extinction

Journal Article.  7980 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics

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