Journal Article

A Comparison of the Effects of Vocal Exercises/Singing Versus Music-Assisted Relaxation on Peak Expiratory Flow Rates of Children with Asthma

Leanne M. Wade

in Music Therapy Perspectives

Published on behalf of American Music Therapy Association

Volume 20, issue 1, pages 31-37
Published in print January 2002 | ISSN: 0734-6875
Published online January 2002 | e-ISSN: 2053-7387 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/mtp/20.1.31
A Comparison of the Effects of Vocal Exercises/Singing Versus Music-Assisted Relaxation on Peak Expiratory Flow Rates of Children with Asthma

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Abstract

Nine subjects who were diagnosed with asthma participated in eight sessions of music therapy. Male and female subjects ranged in age from eight to thirteen years of age. Sessions took place at two area public schools over a four-week time span. All subjects participated in two alternating experimental conditions: Singing and progressive muscle relaxation. Both conditions were presented within each session and alternated across sessions. Dependent measures were taken using a peak flow meter for breathing and a mood evaluation form for current mood state. Four expiratory flow rates and four present mood evaluations were recorded before and after the first treatment and before and after the second treatment during each session. Results indicated that subjects showed an increase or maintenance of lung functioning after singing, while results for subjects were not consistent following the relaxation condition.

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