Journal Article

Intravascular ultrasound imaging of atherosclerotic renal arteries: comparison between in vitro and in vivo studies.

G Yasuda, T Takizawa, I Takasaki, H Shionoiri, S Umemura and K Shimoyama

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation

Volume 13, issue 7, pages 1690-1695
Published in print July 1998 | ISSN: 0931-0509
Published online July 1998 | e-ISSN: 1460-2385 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/13.7.1690
Intravascular ultrasound imaging of atherosclerotic renal arteries: comparison between in vitro and in vivo studies.

Show Summary Details

Preview

BACKGROUND: Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging, a new modality, may be feasible and useful for the assessment of atherosclerotic renal arteries. However, comparison between in vivo and in vitro studies to confirm pathological changes corresponding with IVUS findings obtained from renal arteries was not fully evaluated. METHODS: We evaluated ultrasound images of 18 post-mortem human renal arteries and cross-sectional IVUS images of main renal arteries in five patients with renal artery stenosis (RAS) or essential hypertension. RESULTS: In vitro studies have shown that renal-artery images had three layers when the arteries had fibrous intimal thickening and medial hypertrophy. Renal arteries, in which the fibrous intima was not well developed, showed circumferentially homogeneous bright echoes. In patients with atherosclerotic RAS and essential hypertension, IVUS images showed hyperechoic areas in the renal arterial walls, probably due to atherosclerosis. Typical three-layered ultrasound appearance was not easily seen during in vivo studies. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that hyperechoic images can be a diagnostic clue of atherosclerosis However, in vitro results do not always correspond exactly to in vivo findings, and caution is needed when findings from in vitro IVUS imaging studies are applied to in vivo studies.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Nephrology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.