Journal Article

Treatment of membranous nephropathy

Claudio Ponticelli and Patrizia Passerini

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation

Published on behalf of European Renal Association - European Dialysis and Transplant Assoc

Volume 16, issue suppl_5, pages 8-10
Published in print July 2001 | ISSN: 0931-0509
Published online July 2001 | e-ISSN: 1460-2385 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/16.suppl_5.8
Treatment of membranous nephropathy

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Several therapeutic approaches have been tried in patients with membranous nephropathy. Corticosteroids have been largely used, but a meta‐analysis of the available controlled trials did not show any benefit of corticosteroids either in favouring remission of the nephrotic syndrome or in preventing renal dysfunction. Controversial results have been obtained with cytotoxic agents. Unfortunately, most of the available trials were small in size and had short‐term follow‐ups. Three controlled trials evaluated the role of a 6‐month treatment with methylprednisolone and chlorambucil. The first trial showed that the 10‐year renal survival rate was 92% in treated patients compared with 60% in untreated controls. A second trial compared the effects of methylprednisolone/chlorambucil with those of methylprednisolone alone. The combined treatment achieved remission of nephrotic syndrome in 64% of cases vs 38% in patients given steroids alone. A third trial showed equivalent results in patients randomized to be given methylprednisolone/chlorambucil or methylprednisolone/cyclophosphamide. A number of non‐controlled studies and a randomized trial also showed the efficacy of cyclosporine in reducing proteinuria. In many but not all cases, proteinuria reappeared when cyclosporine was stopped. In conclusion, although the treatment of membranous nephropathy remains difficult, some therapeutical approaches have proved to favour remission and protect renal function

Keywords: chlorambucil; corticosteroid; cyclophosphamide; cyclosporine; membranous nephropathy

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Nephrology

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