Journal Article

Removal of persisting isohaemagglutinins with Ig-Therasorb<sup>®</sup> immunoadsorption after major ABO-incompatible non-myeloablative allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Werner Rabitsch, Paul Knöbl, Hildegard Greinix, Erika Prinz, Peter Kalhs, Walter H. Hörl and Kurt Derfler

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation

Published on behalf of European Renal Association - European Dialysis and Transplant Assoc

Volume 18, issue 11, pages 2405-2408
Published in print November 2003 | ISSN: 0931-0509
Published online November 2003 | e-ISSN: 1460-2385 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfg364
Removal of persisting isohaemagglutinins with Ig-Therasorb® immunoadsorption after major ABO-incompatible non-myeloablative allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background. Major ABO-incompatibility can be associated with haemolysis, prolonged red cell aplasia (PRCA) and higher peri-transplant mortality resulting from organ toxicity after conventional and non-myeloablative allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Different therapeutic strategies have been developed to allow erythroid reconstitution in these patients.

Methods. We present three patients, who developed PRCA after non-myeloablative allogeneic haematological stem cell transplantation for haematological malignancies. The patients were treated with Ig-Therasorb® immunoadsorption (five treatments per week) to remove persisting incompatible isohaemagglutinins.

Results. Two patients became transfusion independent after 12 and 14 treatments. In one patient, however, no reduction of the isohaemagglutinin titres could be observed after 25 treatments, probably due to persistence of his underlying disease.

Conclusions. Although Ig-Therasorb® immunoadsorption was effective in only two patients, it seems to be a promising therapeutic option for patients with PRCA after allogeneic non-myeloablative haematological stem cell transplantation.

Keywords: blood component removal; blood group incompatibility; haematopoetic stem cell transplantation; red cell aplasia

Journal Article.  2033 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Nephrology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.