Journal Article

Impact of the supplementation of kidney mass on blood pressure and progression of kidney disease

Mai Ots, Julia L. Troy, Helmut G. Rennke, Harald S. Mackenzie and Barry M. Brenner

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation

Published on behalf of European Renal Association - European Dialysis and Transplant Assoc

Volume 19, issue 2, pages 337-341
Published in print February 2004 | ISSN: 0931-0509
Published online February 2004 | e-ISSN: 1460-2385 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfg549
Impact of the supplementation of kidney mass on blood pressure and progression of kidney disease

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Background. To test the hypothesis that nephron mass is an independent determinant of arterial pressure, the effects of augmenting renal mass by isograft transplantation were studied in the model of secondary hypertension.

Methods. The effects of isograft transplantation or sham operation on blood pressure, proteinuria, remnant kidney mass, glomerular filtration rate and glomerulosclerosis were assessed in 5/6 nephrectomized (5/6 NPX) rats.

Results. Systolic blood pressure was lowered on average by ∼35 mmHg and glomerular hyperfiltration was attenuated in the remnant kidneys of transplant recipients. Markedly lower urinary protein excretion rates and glomerulosclerosis scores in the remnant kidney accompanied these supplemental transplants to values roughly one-third of those from sham-operated rats.

Conclusions. The data show that reduced renal mass per se is the major factor in the development and maintenance of arterial hypertension and glomerular injury in 5/6 NPX rats and these changes can be reversed by supplementing renal mass. The data provide strong support for the notion that renal mass is a significant, independent determinant of arterial pressure.

Keywords: blood pressure; glomerulosclerosis; nephron number; renal mass; transplantation

Journal Article.  2988 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Nephrology

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