Journal Article

Effect of endothelin receptor antagonist on parathyroid gland growth, PTH values and cell proliferation in azotemic rats

Aquiles Jara, Andrea von Höveling, Ximena Jara, M. Eugenia Burgos, Andres Valdivieso, Sergio Mezzano and Arnold J. Felsenfeld

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation

Published on behalf of European Renal Association - European Dialysis and Transplant Assoc

Volume 21, issue 4, pages 917-923
Published in print April 2006 | ISSN: 0931-0509
Published online January 2006 | e-ISSN: 1460-2385 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfk006
Effect of endothelin receptor antagonist on parathyroid gland growth, PTH values and cell proliferation in azotemic rats

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background. A variety of stimuli are involved in the pathogenesis of parathyroid gland hyperplasia in renal failure. Recently, it was shown that blocking the signal from the endothelin-1 (ET-1) receptor (ETAR/ETBR) by a non-selective receptor antagonist, bosentan, reduced parathyroid cell proliferation, parathyroid gland hyperplasia and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels in normal rats on a calcium deficient diet. Our goal was to determine whether in 5/6 nephrectomized (NPX) rats with developing or established hyperparathyroidism, the endothelin receptor blocker, bosentan, reduced the increase in parathyroid cell proliferation, parathyroid gland hyperplasia and PTH values.

Methods. High (HPD, 1.2%) or normal phosphorus diets (PD) (NPD, 0.6%) were given to 5/6 NPX rats for 15 days (NPX15). In each dietary group, one-half the rats were given bosentan (B) i.p. 100 mg/kg/day. The four groups of rats were: (1) NPX15-1.2% P; (2) NPX15-1.2% P+B; (3) NPX15-0.6% P; and (4) NPX15-0.6% P+B. In a second study in which hyperparathyroidism was already established in 5/6 NPX rats fed a HPD for 15 days, rats were divided into two groups in which one group was maintained on a HPD and the other group was changed to very low PD (VLPD, <0.05%) for an additional 15 days. In each dietary group, one-half the rats were given bosentan i.p. 100 mg/kg-day. The four groups of rats were: (1) NPX30-1.2% P; (2) NPX30-1.2% P+B; (3) NPX30-0.05% P and (4) NPX30-0.05% P+B. Parathyroid cell proliferation was measured by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and ET-1 expression by immunohistochemical techniques.

Results. In the study of developing hyperparathyroidism, bosentan reduced ET-1 expression in the parathyroid glands of rats on the NPD and HPD (P<0.05). But only in rats on the NPD did bosentan result in a reduced increase in parathyroid gland weight (P<0.05). In the study of established hyperparathyroidism, in which 5/6 NPX rats were given a HPD for 15 days, bosentan started on day 15 reduced (P<0.05) ET-1 expression in rats maintained for 15 additional days on the HPD or the VLPD. On the VLPD, parathyroid gland weight was less (P<0.05) than that in rats on the HPD sacrificed at 15 or 30 days. Bosentan did not reduce parathyroid cell proliferation or parathyroid gland weight in rats maintained on the HPD or further reduce these parameters beyond that obtained with dietary phosphorus restriction. PTH values were lowest in the VLPD group, intermediate in the NPD group, and highest in the HPD group, but in none of the three groups did bosentan decrease PTH values.

Conclusions. In azotemic rats with developing hyperparathyroidism, bosentan resulted in a reduced increase in parathyroid gland weight when dietary phosphorus content was normal. Despite a reduction in ET-1 expression in rats on a HPD with developing or established hyperparathyroidism, bosentan did not reduce the increase in parathyroid cell proliferation, parathyroid gland growth or PTH values. Thus, ET-1 blockade with bosentan did not prevent parathyroid gland growth in the azotemic rat.

Keywords: bosentan; dietary phosphorus; endothelin; parathyroid hyperplasia

Journal Article.  4012 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Nephrology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.