Journal Article

Incidence of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the diabetic compared with the non-diabetic population in a German region, 2002–08

Andrea Icks, Burkhard Haastert, Jutta Genz, Guido Giani, Falk Hoffmann, Rudolf Trapp and Michael Koch

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation

Published on behalf of European Renal Association - European Dialysis and Transplant Assoc

Volume 26, issue 1, pages 264-269
Published in print January 2011 | ISSN: 0931-0509
Published online July 2010 | e-ISSN: 1460-2385 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfq398
Incidence of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the diabetic compared with the non-diabetic population in a German region, 2002–08

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Background. This study was conducted to estimate incidences of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the diabetic and non-diabetic populations in Germany, as well as relative and attributable risks of RRT due to diabetes.

Methods. Using the data of a regional dialysis centre (region population of 310 000), we assessed all incident RRT patients aged 30 years or older in 2002–08. We estimated sex- and age-specific and -standardized incidences of RRT in the diabetic and non-diabetic populations, which were estimated by applying diabetes prevalences from a population-based study, and relative and attributable risks due to diabetes.

Results. Of all subjects with incident RRT (n = 544), 49.6% had diabetes. Fifty-eight percent were male, mean age (SD) was 70.3 years (11.4 years). Incidences per 100 000 person-years (standardized to the 2004 German population) in the diabetic and the non-diabetic populations were 213.7 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 159.5–267.8] and 26.9 (95% CI, 22.5–31.3) in men and 130.2 (95% CI, 65.6–194.9) and 16.4 (95% CI, 13.5–19.3) in women, respectively. Standardized relative risks were 7.9 (5.9–10.8) in men and 8.0 (4.7–13.5) in women. There was a significant interaction between age and diabetes, with lower relative risks in higher ages. Attributable risks among diabetic individuals were 0.87 in men and women, and population-attributable risks were 0.41 and 0.35 in men and women, respectively.

Conclusions. In this population-based study in a German region, we found the relative risk of RRT in the estimated adult diabetic population to be 8-fold increased compared with the non-diabetic population. A high proportion of the RRT risk can be attributed to diabetes in the diabetic as well as in the whole population.

Keywords: diabetes; Germany; population-based study; incidences, relative and attributable risks of RRT due to diabetes; renal replacement therapy (RRT)

Journal Article.  3794 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Nephrology

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