Journal Article

Decreased plasma level of vitamin C in chronic kidney disease: comparison between diabetic and non-diabetic patients

Nobuyuki Takahashi, Satoshi Morimoto, Mitsuhiko Okigaki, Maiko Seo, Kazunori Someya, Tatsuyori Morita, Hiroaki Matsubara, Tetsuro Sugiura and Toshiji Iwasaka

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation

Published on behalf of European Renal Association - European Dialysis and Transplant Assoc

Volume 26, issue 4, pages 1252-1257
Published in print April 2011 | ISSN: 0931-0509
Published online September 2010 | e-ISSN: 1460-2385 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfq547
Decreased plasma level of vitamin C in chronic kidney disease: comparison between diabetic and non-diabetic patients

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Background. A decreased plasma level of vitamin C has been reported to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Here, we sought to determine the vitamin C status of patients with chronic kidney disease and the pathophysiological role of vitamin C in these patients.

Methods. We studied 58 patients and evaluated the relationship between renal function and plasma vitamin C concentration, as well as the effect of diabetes on this relationship. Endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation of brachial artery was measured to assess the endothelial function. Serum malondialdehyde low-density lipoprotein was measured as a marker for oxidative stress.

Results. Plasma vitamin C concentration had a positive linear relationship with eGFR in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients (P = 0.006 and P = 0.004, respectively). When vitamin C concentration and eGFR relationships were compared in the two groups, vitamin C concentration was significantly lower in diabetic patients at every eGFR (P = 0.006). Flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery was positively correlated with vitamin C concentration in non-diabetic patients (P = 0.047) but not in diabetic patients. There was a negative correlation between serum malondialdehyde low-density lipoprotein and vitamin C concentration in non-diabetic patients (P = 0.044) but not in diabetic patients.

Conclusions. Renal dysfunction was associated with a decrease in plasma vitamin C level. Moreover, decreased vitamin C may cause endothelial dysfunction via an increase in oxidative stress in non-diabetic chronic kidney disease patients.

Keywords: endothelial function; estimated glomerular filtration rate; flow-mediated dilatation; malondialdehyde low-density lipoprotein; vitamin C

Journal Article.  3637 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Nephrology

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