Article

Hesiod

Ruth Scodel

in Classics

ISBN: 9780195389661
Published online December 2009 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780195389661-0019
Hesiod

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Until relatively recently, most scholars agreed that an individual named Hesiod (Greek, Hesiodos; Latin, Hesiodus), whose poems said that he lived in the village of Ascra in Boeotia and won a tripod in a bardic competition at the funeral games of King Amphidamas, composed the Theogony and Works and Days. Other poems, including the Catalogue of Women and the Shield of Heracles, were falsely attributed to him later. He was the son of a man who had migrated to the mainland from Aeolic Cyme in Asia Minor, and had a brother named Perses. Hesiod was revered alongside Homer in the Classical period and was adapted by Hellenistic poets as a poetic predecessor.

Article.  7012 words. 

Subjects: Classical Studies ; Classical Art and Architecture ; Classical History ; Classical Literature ; Classical Philosophy

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