Article

Quintilian

Elaine Fantham and Emily Fairey

in Classics

ISBN: 9780195389661
Published online December 2009 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780195389661-0057
Quintilian

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Classical Studies
  • Classical Art and Architecture
  • Classical History
  • Classical Literature
  • Classical Philosophy

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Marcus Fabius Quintilianus was born c. 35 ce in Calagurris in Hispania (modern Calahorra in La Rioja, Spain). His father, a well-educated man, sent him to Rome to study rhetoric early in the reign of Nero. Quintilian evidently adopted as his model Domitius Afer, who died in 59, and listened to him speak and plead cases in the law courts. Sometime after Afer’s death, Quintilian returned to Spain, possibly to practice law in the courts of his own province. However, in 68 he returned to Rome as part of the retinue of the emperor Galba, Nero’s short-lived successor. After Galba’s death, and during the chaotic Year of the Four Emperors that followed, Quintilian opened a public school of rhetoric. Among his students were Pliny the Younger, and perhaps Tacitus. Quintilian received the ornamenta consularia under Domitian, but was not consul. Of his personal life, little is known. In the Institutio oratoria, he mentions a wife who died young, as well as two sons who predeceased him. Quintilian retired from teaching and pleading in 88, during the reign of Domitian. His retirement may have been prompted by his achievement of financial security and his desire to become a gentleman of leisure. The emperor does not appear to have taken offense; in the year 90, Quintilian was made tutor of Domitian’s two grand-nephews and heirs, and he was shortly afterward honored with the privileges of an ex-consul. Otherwise, Quintilian spent his retirement writing his Institutio oratoria. The exact date of his death is not known but is believed to be sometime around 100.

Article.  3049 words. 

Subjects: Classical Studies ; Classical Art and Architecture ; Classical History ; Classical Literature ; Classical Philosophy

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.