Article

Greek Religion

Angelos Chaniotis

in Classics

ISBN: 9780195389661
Published online February 2010 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780195389661-0058
Greek Religion

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Because of the importance of Greek religion and mythology for the study of literature and philosophy, but also for art and theology, interest in this field began earlier than the systematic study of most other fields of Classical studies (e.g., archaeology and ancient history). In the course of two centuries, the study of Greek religion has moved from the study of myths of gods and heroes to a historical, sociological, and anthropological approach that emphasizes the position of religious beliefs and activities in the life of the Greeks and the Hellenized populations of the larger Greek world (colonies and conquered territories), both in the poleis and in other types of communal organization. This bibliography does not reflect the history of the discipline and the influence of different theoretical approaches (myth-and-ritual theory, structuralism, behavioral theory, psychoanalysis, etc.). Instead, it presents important tools for the study of Greek religion (bibliographies, series, journals, works of reference), where one can find further information on sources and studies. It also provides a very basic orientation to the main aspects of Greek religion and current discussions. Mythology, naturally relevant for the study of Greek religion, is not comprehensively covered by this bibliography. Because of the limited space, there is an emphasis on recent studies, where one can find earlier bibliography. This bibliography considers as “Greek religion” not only the religion of the Greeks but also, in the Hellenistic and Roman Imperial periods, the religion of areas where the source material is primarily in the Greek language (Asia Minor, Egypt, the Near East).

Article.  24925 words. 

Subjects: Classical Studies ; Classical Art and Architecture ; Classical History ; Classical Literature ; Classical Philosophy

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