Article

History of Scholarship of Classical Art History

A.A. Donohue

in Classics

ISBN: 9780195389661
Published online April 2011 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780195389661-0135
History of Scholarship of Classical Art History

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  • Classical Studies
  • Classical Art and Architecture
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The study of classical art began in antiquity, and the remains of its critical and historical traditions continue to shape the discipline. In post-Antique times the field evolved from a subject given prominence by the dominance of ancient Greece and Rome in Western intellectual, literary, and artistic culture into one that today exists almost purely as an academic specialty. Classical art history is an inherently synthetic field that not only interprets the full range of the visual arts within their original historical and social contexts, but also takes account of their subsequent reception. Classical art in the broadest sense encompasses the formative, prehistoric stages of the classical cultures through the close of antiquity, both in their homelands and in the areas with which they interacted. The historiography of classical art deals with a broad range of issues reflecting the changing situations in which the studies were undertaken and includes both specific questions about the interpretation of individual works and more general inquiries that form part of the wider history of culture and ideas. To trace the history of scholarship accordingly requires consideration of an exceptionally wide body of evidence relating to ancient and modern practices and their historical, intellectual, and institutional frameworks.

Article.  10126 words. 

Subjects: Classical Studies ; Classical Art and Architecture ; Classical History ; Classical Literature ; Classical Philosophy

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