Article

George Berkeley

Daniel Flage

in Philosophy

ISBN: 9780195396577
Published online May 2010 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780195396577-0013
George Berkeley

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George Berkeley (b. 1685–d. 1753) was an Irish philosopher best known for his contention that the physical world is nothing but a compilation of ideas. This is represented by his famous aphorism esse est percipi (to be is to be perceived). Although most scholarly work has focused on Berkeley’s idealism and immaterialism in A Treatise concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge (PHK, references by section) and Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous (DHP, references to pages in Works of George Berkeley [Berkeley 1948–1957], Vol. 2), his work was not limited to metaphysics. His works on vision have influenced discussions of visual perception―including psychological discussions―from his time to the present. He wrote on ethics and natural law. He wrote on mathematics and physics. He wrote on economics and monetary theory. His final work, Siris, combines a discussion of the medicinal value of tar water with what some argued is a metaphysics that differs from that of his youth.

Article.  7728 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy ; Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art ; Epistemology ; Feminist Philosophy ; History of Western Philosophy ; Metaphysics ; Moral Philosophy ; Non-Western Philosophy ; Philosophy of Language ; Philosophy of Law ; Philosophy of Mathematics and Logic ; Philosophy of Mind ; Philosophy of Religion ; Philosophy of Science ; Social and Political Philosophy

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