Article

Giovanni Boccaccio

Chris Kleinhenz

in Medieval Studies

ISBN: 9780195396584
Published online December 2010 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780195396584-0007
Giovanni Boccaccio

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500)
  • Literary Studies (Early and Medieval)
  • Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy
  • Byzantine and Medieval Art (500 CE to 1400)
  • Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Archaeology

GO

Preview

Giovanni Boccaccio (b. 1313–d. 1375) is generally considered the father of Italian prose because of his masterpiece, the Decameron, which had a major shaping effect on the development of the frame-tale narrative both in Italy and in the rest of Europe in subsequent centuries. Together with Dante and Petrarch, he is one of the “Three Crowns” of Florence, for these authors essentially began the Italian literary tradition and set the standards of style in poetry and prose for centuries to come. Among Boccaccio’s other prose works in Italian are L’elegia di madonna Fiammetta, often called the first psychological novel, and Il filocolo, a prose romance. He also made major contributions in the areas of narrative poetry (for example, Filostrato, Teseida, and Amorosa visione), Latin treatises (for example, De casibus virorum illustrium, De claris mulieribus, and Genealogia deorum gentiliumlibri), and poetry (Egloghe). Among his other works are numerous lyric poems (Rime); a prosimetrum (L’ameto); a pastoral in terza rima (La caccia di Diana); an enigmatic, apparently misogynist work in prose (Il corbaccio); a biography of Dante (Trattatello in laude di Dante); and a major commentary on the Inferno (Esposizioni sopra la Comedia), which resulted from his public lectures on Dante in Florence. The one hundred tales in the Decameron were a major source of themes and plots for subsequent authors of short stories, novels, and plays. Because of their elegant classicizing style and lexical richness, Boccaccio’s tales also served as models of excellence in Italian prose for centuries.

Article.  18397 words. 

Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500) ; Literary Studies (Early and Medieval) ; Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy ; Byzantine and Medieval Art (500 CE to 1400) ; Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Archaeology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribeRecommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »