Article

Petrarch

Chris Kleinhenz

in Medieval Studies

ISBN: 9780195396584
Published online May 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780195396584-0024
Petrarch

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500)
  • Literary Studies (Early and Medieval)
  • Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy
  • Byzantine and Medieval Art (500 CE to 1400)
  • Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Archaeology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Through his Canzoniere, Francesco Petrarca (b. 1304–d. 1374) shaped in indelible ways the development of the love lyric both in Italy and in the rest of Europe in subsequent centuries. His influence is both stylistic and thematic: the refined language and metrical excellence of his verse provided the model for lyric poetry, and his elaboration and minute examination of the phenomenology of love served as a touchstone for poets concerned with these matters. It is no accident that his future imitators were known as petrarchisti and that the complex of ideas and topics relating to his particular understanding of love became known generally as “Petrarchism.” He is also considered to be an important precursor of Italian humanism because of his many erudite Latin writings and philological interests. Together with Dante and Boccaccio, Petrarch is one of the “Three Crowns” of Florence, because these authors essentially began the Italian literary tradition and set the standards of style in poetry and prose for centuries to come. Petrarch was also a great traveler and connoisseur of antiquities, and in these areas he was regarded as a pioneer. His other major Italian work in poetry is the series of six allegorical narratives in terza rima, the Trionfi, and his Latin works in verse include the epic Africa and pastoral poems, the Bucolicum carmen. Petrarch is generally viewed as the major link between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

Article.  18921 words. 

Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500) ; Literary Studies (Early and Medieval) ; Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy ; Byzantine and Medieval Art (500 CE to 1400) ; Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Archaeology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.