Article

Games and Recreations

Nicholas Orme

in Medieval Studies

ISBN: 9780195396584
Published online March 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780195396584-0025
Games and Recreations

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500)
  • Literary Studies (Early and Medieval)
  • Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy
  • Byzantine and Medieval Art (500 CE to 1400)
  • Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Archaeology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

The history of games and recreations found an early exponent in Joseph Strutt in 1801 but attracted little attention from writers on social and cultural topics until recent decades, except with regard to certain individual pursuits. As one would expect, however, such activities were widely enjoyed by young and old, male and female. Children played individually with toys and socially in games. Adults engaged in board games, often for money, and in active pursuits. Some sports, such as tournaments and hunting, were monopolized by the nobility and gentry and acted as marks of status, but archery and ball games were common throughout society, and common people encroached on hunting through poaching. The most physical sports tended to be dominated by men, but some women used bows and both genders joined socially in music and dancing. More research needs to be done on individual games such as football (meaning any traditional game played with foot and ball), and on relating recreations to wider social and cultural attitudes and activities.

Article.  5506 words. 

Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500) ; Literary Studies (Early and Medieval) ; Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy ; Byzantine and Medieval Art (500 CE to 1400) ; Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Archaeology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.