Article

Medieval Archaeology in Britain, Fifth to Eleventh Centuries

David A. Hinton

in Medieval Studies

ISBN: 9780195396584
Published online December 2010 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780195396584-0053
Medieval Archaeology in Britain, Fifth to Eleventh Centuries

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  • Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500)
  • Literary Studies (Early and Medieval)
  • Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy
  • Byzantine and Medieval Art (500 CE to 1400)
  • Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Archaeology

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The extent and effects of population movements dominate the study of the 5th and 6th centuries, and the Viking raids and settlement renew the theme of migration for the 9th to 11th. The ways the end of Roman administration led to social and economic change, the degree to which the empire’s cultural impact continued, how religious practices varied, and the nature of exchange mechanisms are dominant issues (The European Perspective). As in much of Europe, the early part of the period is protohistoric, with little or no direct documentary evidence. Its archaeology is the study of bodies (Anglo-Saxon Cemeteries), buildings (Rural Settlement, Agriculture, and Food), and artifacts (Artifacts); of farming systems, settlements, and settlement patterns (Rural Settlement, Agriculture, and Food); of social distinctions; of long-distance and regional networks and the reemergence of towns and coinage (Towns, Trade, and Transport); and of burial customs and other expressions of belief (Anglo-Saxon Cemeteries; Other Manifestations of Religions and Identities). It focuses now on how people achieved their sense of cultural identity through belonging to family, tribe, region, kingdom, and nation-state and in their gender, place in a hierarchy, dependency upon others for service or protection, and control of exploitation of resources.

Article.  24499 words. 

Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500) ; Literary Studies (Early and Medieval) ; Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy ; Byzantine and Medieval Art (500 CE to 1400) ; Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Archaeology

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