Article

Post-Conquest England

Joel Rosenthal

in Medieval Studies

ISBN: 9780195396584
Published online December 2010 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780195396584-0072
Post-Conquest England

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  • Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500)
  • Literary Studies (Early and Medieval)
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The customary periodization of English history refers to the period before the Norman Conquest as the Anglo-Saxon or Old English period, and then “medieval history” is seen to begin in 1066, though this conventional English distinction is not usually followed in the United States. Furthermore, late 20th-century and early 21st-century scholarship has worked to erode the milestone boundaries of both 1066, at the beginning, and 1485, at the end, in terms of these dates being seen as the years that define or bracket medieval history. Regarding 1066, the extent to which the new Norman monarchy was based upon and built itself as an extension of late Anglo-Saxon society and statecraft has received considerable attention, while at the far end scholars have argued that we can narrow (if not close) the gap between the late-medieval world of the Lancastrian and Yorkist dynasties in the 15th century and that of the early Tudors after 1485.

Article.  14861 words. 

Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500) ; Literary Studies (Early and Medieval) ; Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy ; Byzantine and Medieval Art (500 CE to 1400) ; Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Archaeology

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