Article

The Juvenile Justice System

Terrance J. Taylor

in Criminology

ISBN: 9780195396607
Published online December 2009 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780195396607-0042
The Juvenile Justice System

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The American juvenile justice system is an often-misunderstood component of our justice system. Developed in the late 1800s, the juvenile justice system was designed to be distinct from the adult criminal justice system. This was based, in part, on the idea that youth offenders were particularly malleable and would be more responsive than adults to individualized treatment efforts. Since its inception, the mission of the juvenile justice system has emphasized discretion and rehabilitation. Yet throughout history there have been calls for the juvenile justice system to take on a mission and form similar to that of the adult criminal justice system. The readings highlighted here focus on the history and mission of the juvenile justice system, the function of key juvenile justice institutions (such as police, court, and corrections), and how the system has changed over time (alternatives and innovations).

Article.  4665 words. 

Subjects: Criminology and Criminal Justice ; Criminal Justice ; Criminology

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