Homicide Victimization

Marc Riedel and Gwen Hunnicutt

in Criminology

ISBN: 9780195396607
Published online April 2012 | | DOI:
Homicide Victimization

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Beginning with a legal definition, the 8th edition of Black’s Law Dictionary defines homicide as the killing of one person by another. The killing of another, whether lawful or not lawful, is homicide; there is no crime of homicide, says Brian Garner in Black’s Law Dictionary. Criminal homicide is divided into murder and manslaughter. Justifiable homicide is divided into justifiable homicide by civilians such as self-defense, justifiable homicides by police, and state-sanctioned killings such as executions. What may be confusing is that researchers frequently use the term homicide and do not distinguish between murder and manslaughter. The research does consistently distinguish between criminal homicide and justifiable homicide. As Black’s Law Dictionary goes on to point out, there are a variety of homicide laws that are not given much attention by researchers. The approach used here is meant to explore additional dimensions of homicide in more detail. For example, this article not only examines the expansion of the number of data sets to study homicide but also compares the two major sources: police and medical examiners/coroners. Other sections also examine the context of homicides. In the Juvenile Homicides section, we examine gender differences as well as the success of various treatment programs. In Family Homicides, we not only examine different types of family homicides but also explore the well-known Darwinian hypothesis.

Article.  10576 words. 

Subjects: Criminology and Criminal Justice ; Criminal Justice ; Criminology

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