Article

New France and Louisiana

Geoffrey Plank

in Atlantic History

ISBN: 9780199730414
Published online July 2011 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199730414-0042
New France and Louisiana

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • History of the Americas
  • European History
  • African History
  • History
  • Regional and National History

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

The colonies France founded on the mainland of North America in the seventeenth century, Acadia, Canada, and Louisiana, have rich, distinctive literatures. A growing scholarly literature over the last twenty years or so has also deepened our knowledge of the eighteenth-century French colonies of Ile Royale, on Cape Breton Island, and Illinois. By contrast, the failed sixteenth-century Huguenot colony of Caroline and the French outpost at Placentia, on Newfoundland, have not received the attention they deserve. In contrast to Britain’s North American empire, France’s colonies are rarely discussed as a group, and French imperial history in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries remains a field in the making. Among American and British scholars, two features of France’s colonial experience in America garner the most attention: the foundations of the peculiar racial politics of Louisiana, and relations between Native Americans and the French in the Great Lakes region.

Article.  3430 words. 

Subjects: History of the Americas ; European History ; African History ; History ; Regional and National History

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.