Article

Democracy in World Politics

Andrea Ribeiro-Hoffmann

in International Relations

ISBN: 9780199743292
Published online March 2011 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199743292-0058
Democracy in World Politics

Show Summary Details

Preview

The relation between democracy and world politics is manifold. At the conceptual level, a number of schools of thought can be distinguished. Drawing on works from classical and contemporary political philosophers from Immanuel Kant to Jurgen Habermas, these schools address the classical contentions between liberal and communitarian, representative and participative, and procedural and deliberative models of democracy, as well the role of nation-states as “borders” of the spaces where democracy can, or should, flourish. These debates are linked to questions of authority and legitimacy in world politics and are also addressed in the literature of global governance and global civil society. The more specific literature on democratic peace theory deals with the relation between political regimes and international conflict. At the practical level, two main ways to think about the relations between democracy and world politics can be distinguished. First, one can examine the extent to which decision-making processes within international organizations are democratic. Second, one can look at how world politics affect political regimes at the nation-state level, such as domestic democracy. The following cited works reflect these branches of the major debates on democracy and world politics. When referring to international institutions, the cited works are subdivided into UN system organizations, the European Union, and others. The impact of world politics on domestic democracies is treated at two levels: as a result of policies of democracy promotion (by nation-states and by international organizations), and as a consequence of globalization.

Article.  6456 words. 

Subjects: International Relations

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.