Article

Civil War in Sub-Saharan Africa

Zachariah Mampilly

in Political Science

ISBN: 9780199756223
Published online November 2011 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199756223-0006
Civil War in Sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Politics
  • Comparative Politics
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The study of African civil wars has boomed since 2000 as scholars have recognized the predominance of internal wars over interstate wars in the post-Cold War context. The collapse of the Soviet Union brought with it an influx of illegal weaponry and the weakening of many proxy states, leading to a spike in conflict in the early 1990s as political and economic elites sought to take advantage of the new political dispensation. Across the continent, a variety of insurgent organizations caused immeasurable death and destruction, whether small rag-tag outfits like the Lord’s Resistance Army in Uganda; proxy armies of foreign governments, such as the Revolutionary United Front in Sierra Leone; or more conventional insurgent forces, such as the Sudan People’s Liberation Army. In addition, conflicts in places like Somalia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo took on hybrid forms mixing internal wars with interstate wars. As a result, no single approach fully captures the broad range of experiences of African civil war.

Article.  7939 words. 

Subjects: Politics ; Comparative Politics ; Political Institutions ; Political Methodology ; Political Theory

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