Article

Immigration

Irene Bloemraad and Edwin Lin

in Sociology

ISBN: 9780199756384
Published online July 2011 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199756384-0026
Immigration

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The field of immigration research is broadly interested in understanding why people migrate across international borders, and what the consequences of migration are for the individuals involved, as well as the people and societies they enter and leave behind. In some countries, more than one in five residents were not born in the country where they live, while the economies of other countries are heavily dependent on the money that migrants send back. Migration thus affects a wide range of societies around the globe and can affect almost all aspects of human life. Sociologists consequently seek to explain population movements and state policies of migration control, debate theories of integration across a range of human activities, and consider the consequences of migration for development, national identities, and conceptions of membership in a world increasingly characterized by human relationships that span the borders of contemporary nation-states. Sociologists who work on migration do so in conversation with scholars drawn from many disciplines, including anthropology, demography, economics, ethnic studies, geography, history, legal studies, and political science. Given that the sociological field of migration studies is fundamentally interdisciplinary, any bibliography must be multidisciplinary, and it will invariably provide only a very small snapshot of the whole. The snapshot below, to remain manageable, is restricted to English-language publications, and it provides greater coverage of the US case than of other countries or regions of the world.

Article.  13116 words. 

Subjects: Sociology ; Comparative and Historical Sociology ; Economic Sociology ; Gender and Sexuality ; Health, Illness, and Medicine ; Population and Demography ; Race and Ethnicity ; Social Movements and Social Change ; Social Stratification, Inequality, and Mobility ; Social Theory

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