Article

Entrepreneurship

Patricia H. Thornton and Ling Yang

in Sociology

ISBN: 9780199756384
Published online November 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199756384-0109
Entrepreneurship

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Sociology
  • Comparative and Historical Sociology
  • Economic Sociology
  • Gender and Sexuality
  • Health, Illness, and Medicine
  • Population and Demography
  • Race and Ethnicity
  • Social Movements and Social Change
  • Social Stratification, Inequality, and Mobility
  • Social Theory

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Entrepreneurship as an engine of innovation and job creation is a mechanism for changing the distribution of wealth and well-being in society. Entrepreneurship is the process of identifying and developing economic and social opportunities through the efforts of individuals and organizations, which can result in starting and building new businesses, either as independent enterprises or within incumbent organizations. Individuals discover opportunities in markets and organizations; how these opportunities are pursued results in different forms of entrepreneurship, such as independent start-ups, licensing activity, corporate ventures and spin-offs, and nonprofits. Because entrepreneurship is inexorably linked to institutional processes and organizational forms, the discipline of sociology is central to the development of entrepreneurship research. In the early 21st century, considerable resources have been devoted to the study of entrepreneurship, and this momentum points to an increasing variety of research perspectives. The threads of coherence to this bibliographic selection stem from a Weberian view of institutions. Just as Max Weber viewed society as composed of various institutional orders and organizational forms, the field of entrepreneurship research is composed of interdisciplinary perspectives drawing from the social sciences. Although this article takes a sociological view, it also includes selected works of authors in the sister social, management, and financial sciences that borrow sociological concepts or that flesh out the relevance of the sociology of entrepreneurship. This border crossing is more prevalent with the classic scholars because they are a relatively fuzzy set. Finally, in keeping with the good scholarly practice of elucidating the roots of ideas, this bibliography strives to include the classics and the initial theoretical and empirical formulations and their key elaborations, focusing more on the mechanisms that explain entrepreneurship.

Article.  8326 words. 

Subjects: Sociology ; Comparative and Historical Sociology ; Economic Sociology ; Gender and Sexuality ; Health, Illness, and Medicine ; Population and Demography ; Race and Ethnicity ; Social Movements and Social Change ; Social Stratification, Inequality, and Mobility ; Social Theory

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.