Article

Global Health Promotion

Angela Scriven

in Public Health

ISBN: 9780199756797
Published online February 2011 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199756797-0007
Global Health Promotion

Preview

There are a number of reasons why a global perspective and understanding relating to health promotion have become necessary. First, we live in an interconnected world, where boundaries separating us as individuals and population groups are rapidly eroding. The health and consequent health promotion implications of this interconnectedness are wide-ranging and multifaceted. Many of the health risks and public health priorities are global, and there is now recognition that the health of every nation is dependent on the health of others. Those countries with weak health profiles resulting from poor socioeconomic development will have repercussions for global health. The increasing health inequalities between countries are creating huge global asymmetries and significant challenges for those working to promote health gain. A number of global antihealth forces are compromising population health both within and between nations. In this context, health promotion principles and actions have never been more appropriate or more needed. Over the period from the Ottawa Conference through the six global conferences leading to the Bangkok Charter for Health Promotion, a large body of evidence and experience has accumulated about the importance of health promotion as an integrative, cost-effective strategy and as an essential component of health systems’ response to global health concerns. This article will begin with a section on introductory readings on global health promotion that establish the frame of reference. A consideration of some of the related journals follows; further citations are grouped under some of the key global health promotion issues and challenges: globalization; evidence of effectiveness; key global initiatives; and priority areas, including diet, physical activity and obesity, chronic diseases, health inequalities. The article concludes with references focusing on the relationship between the development agenda and health promotion.

Article.  5985 words. 

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribeRecommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »