Article

Coaching and Feedback for Leadership Development

Mark D. Cannon

in Education

ISBN: 9780199756810
Published online December 2011 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199756810-0005
Coaching and Feedback for Leadership Development

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The use of coaching and feedback to develop leaders has grown dramatically in recent years in private-sector organizations and has become generally accepted as a valuable method of leadership development. Increasingly, school districts are experimenting with coaching and feedback for leadership development and performance improvement. Although numerous types of coaching are being used in schools, this bibliography focuses specifically on coaching and feedback. It draws heavily on research done in private-sector organizations because that is where most of the studies on coaching and feedback for leadership development have occurred. Early psychologists recognized that accurate feedback is essential for learning and performance improvement. More recently, methods of gathering multisource feedback have been developed to produce better-quality feedback. However, feedback alone often proves insufficient to bring about appropriate changes in behavior and performance. Thus, coaching has been proposed as desirable in combination with feedback. Coaching is typically a one-on-one intervention through which the coach helps the leader assess current performance, set goals, design an action plan for improvement, and then enact a plan. Although there is a growing interest in coaching among scholars, the writing on the subject has been dominated by practitioners. Scholarly research, especially the use of randomized controlled studies to investigate the effectiveness of coaching and feedback practices, has lagged behind the writing done by practitioners, but it is beginning to catch up. Because coaching is costly, organizations are eager to gain a better evidence-based understanding of best practices in coaching to determine how best to invest in leadership development. This bibliography includes work by both scholars and practitioners and makes some clarifications of writing that is primarily oriented toward scholars and of writing that is primarily oriented toward practitioners.

Article.  6473 words. 

Subjects: Education ; Organization and Management of Education ; Philosophy and Theory of Education ; Schools Studies ; Teaching Skills and Techniques

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