Article

Private and Independent Schools

Edward J. Fox

in Education

ISBN: 9780199756810
Published online December 2011 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199756810-0029
Private and Independent Schools

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  • Education
  • Organization and Management of Education
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The independent schools in the United States are characterized by the following: they are operated as not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organizations; they are self-governing through a self-perpetuating board; they are independent of any state or church control; they are diverse; they receive no governmental funds and finance themselves through tuition and through voluntary giving; and they are guided by a specific mission. Note that independent schools are not to be confused with the independent public-school districts in such states as Texas and New Mexico. The independent schools are disproportionately influential in this country in private (nonpublic) education, but their enrollment is only 9 percent of the total nonpublic school enrollment. In 2009, 49.8 million students attended the public schools, according to the USDOE statistics, and 6.7 million students attended the nonpublic schools. The independent schools, then, encompass less than 1 percent of the total school-age population, but, again, they are disproportionately influential in this country. They represent a strong political voice in Washington, DC. Generally, there is very little written about independent schools. What follows is intended to be a useful annotated bibliography about the independent schools and their attendant thinking.

Article.  5955 words. 

Subjects: Education ; Organization and Management of Education ; Philosophy and Theory of Education ; Schools Studies ; Teaching Skills and Techniques

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